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Pace with Purpose

February 22 @ 10:00 am - 11:30 am

Pacing has a purpose. Your training should consist of pacing specific to you and your goals. To hit that goal (and to get faster), you should be training at varying paces, each pace, and workout designed to train a specific system in your body to facilitate endurance benefits. In many cases, we see individuals train at paces too fast for their race goals, while this can feel good at the beginning of a workout, runners are foregoing the true purpose and benefits of their workout. Running gains come with hard work and determination, but also a bit of understanding of the science behind how you get faster without “overdoing it” during a workout, which can result in burnout, exhaustion, and even injury, taking you farther away from your end goal.

 

Join Physical Therapist and running coach Jason Lakritz for a pacing series designed to help you train at the right paces for YOU. Each session focuses on a specific training pace (tempo, interval, marathon) and each runner will receive their custom workout and pacing when they arrive. The workouts are strong examples of what an ideal tempo, interval and marathon pace workout should incorporate. Programming for Pace with Purpose includes:

(full description of session paces found below schedule & rsvp)

 

All sessions will take place on Saturday mornings at 10:00am at the East River Track 

 

DATE  PACE DESCRIPTION
February 8th Tempo The purpose behind a tempo run (pace at which your body is able to clear out lactic acid as it is produced) is to train your lactic threshold system so that your body becomes more and more efficient at removing lactic acid as it is produced, ultimately allowing you to hold a faster pace for a longer amount of time aka, distance running.
February 22nd Interval Interval runs consist of hard, fast running for short periods of time (flooding the body with lactic acid) followed by a rest period (your body removes the lactic acid build-up), running hard again, rest, repeat, repeat. Interval pace is faster than your 5K and repeating this type of training allows your body to learn how to clear lactic acid at a faster rate.
DATE TBD Marathon + Timed Mile Somewhere between your easy run. Running at marathon pace is meant to train your body on utilizing oxygen to burn fat to create energy. When you run at an aerobic level, more oxygen at a slower pace, you are training your body to create more energy. The series will end with a timed mile, not won by fastest time, but won by the runner who paces closest to their estimated time (you choose the pace, you just have to hit it!). The Mile is run without a watch and the runner closest to their estimated pacing wins recovery prizes from Finish Line PT!

 

 

R E G I S T E R   H E R E

 

Pace with Purpose | INTERVAL SESSION 2/22

(once you submit the above form you are registered, you will not receive an additional email confirmation!)

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T E M P O    R U N

 

the definition

A tempo run is considered lactic threshold running, this is the fastest pace you can run at, still allowing your body to clear out lactic acid as it is being produced.

In general, a tempo run is usually paced at 15-20 seconds slower per mile than your 5K pace and is often described as a “comfortably hard pace”.

 

the science

The purpose behind a tempo run (pace at which your body is able to clear out lactic acid as it is produced) is to train your lactic threshold system so that your body becomes more and more efficient at removing lactic acid as it is produced, ultimately allowing you to hold a faster pace for a longer amount of time aka, distance running.

When you run fast, you are training your anaerobic system, so you are burning carbs to produce energy. When carbs are burned for fuel, lactic acid is released into the body/muscles. When you run easy, your body uses oxygen to burn fat for energy (less lactic acid released into the body). As you train your lactic threshold over time and acclimate your body to faster paces, you move your lactic threshold allowing your body to feel more comfortable at a faster pace, resulting in utilizing fat as fuel as opposed to carbs. Burning fewer carbs equals less lactic acid byproducts in the body, allowing you to keep your faster pace for longer.

 

the training

Often times people run their tempo runs at paces too fast for the training benefits. There is a mentality and a belief that you need to go out as fast as you can during a tempo run, and be huffing and puffing, however, going out that hard trains a completely different system. Once you pass your lactic acid threshold (by going too fast and not allowing your body to clear out the lactic acid byproduct that is accumulating in your muscles) it is very hard to recover throughout the rest of the run and you lose the potential gains a tempo run promotes. Rather this process needs to be gradual, allowing your body to slowly increase its ability to remove accumulated lactic acid from your muscles. 

The duration of a tempo run is also key. Often times people go for 45-60-minute tempo runs, feeling like the pace was doable, however, if you are able to maintain a comfortable consistent pace for 60-minutes, then you aren’t training your lactic threshold, and you aren’t working hard enough to move your lactic threshold line to allow speed gains. A tempo run should be designed around 20-30-minutes of “comfortably hard” running that allows you to push your lactic threshold line and trains your body to remove lactic acid at this faster challenging pace, but not so fast that you overload your body with lactic acid at a rate that cannot be removed/recovered from.

 

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I N T E R V A L     R U N

 

the definition

Interval runs consist of hard, fast running for short periods of time followed by a rest period, running hard, rest, repeat, repeat. Interval pace is faster than your 5K. 

 

the science

In interval training, you are running at fast paces, utilizing carbs for fuel to increase the production of lactic acid in your body, aka creating a build-up/surplus of lactic acid, during a running “burst” that is immediately followed by a rest period. The build-up of lactic acid from running at fast speeds followed by a rest period allows your body time to remove that lactic acid so that you recover before starting another interval/running “burst” to again flood your body with lactic acid. Repeating this type of training allows your body to learn how to clear lactic acid at a faster rate.

 

the training

As noted under tempo runs, people often try to run at interval paces when doing a tempo run resulting in fewer miles and an inability to move that lactic threshold line appropriately. Additionally, if you are going out too fast for your interval run/paces you are not going to allow your body to properly recover from the surplus of lactic acid you have flooded it with, aka the lactic acid surplus is too large and your body is not able to remove enough before your next interval, resulting in an amount of lactic acid your body is not able to process for the duration of the workout, preventing system training to remove lactic acid at a faster rate. You must also be sure to allow enough rest between the intervals so that you remove as much lactic acid as possible and then once again run at that hard/fast pace.

 

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M A R A T H O N     P A C E

 

the definition

Somewhere between your easy run. A minute to a minute and a half slower than your 5K pace and should feel just a little bit harder than your easy run, but not as challenging as a tempo run. You should be able to maintain this pace for 2-4 hours.

 

the science

Running at marathon pace (not reaching your lactic threshold like in a tempo run or flooding your body with a surplus of lactic acid like in your interval training) is meant to train your body on utilizing oxygen to burn fat to create energy. When you run at an aerobic level, utilizing more oxygen at a slower pace, you are training your body to create more energy for itself. Your body learns to use the oxygen in an efficient way at this pace allowing you to expend energy at this pace for a long period of time.

 

the training

Going out too fast. If you start out too fast you are using too many carbs resulting in lactic acid. If you go to slow you aren’t training your body to use oxygen efficiently at that pace, so if that is your marathon pace goal, your body won’t be as prepared on race day. 

Details

Date:
February 22
Time:
10:00 am - 11:30 am