Hannah Poges
Marketing & Patient Representative, Administration

Hannah officially joins the Finish Line team after being a long time fan coming in for physical therapy and recovery services. She supports our marketing initiatives and community events as well as the front desk making sure our patients receive the best experience at our clinic.  As a New York transplant from Louisiana, she loves being a part of the running community and the sense of family it has given her.

 

Hannah grew up swimming and was a coach in high school and into college.  However, after graduating from LSU with a bachelor’s degree in Finance and moving to New York, she picked up casual running as a way to explore the city.  With a marathon on her bucket list, she entered the lottery fully expecting not to get in.  At the time, barely being able to run a mile without stopping, the thought of running 26.2 seemed impossible. Luckily, with a great training plan with Nike Project Moonshot and the resources at FLPT, she crossed the NYC marathon finish line back in 2017.  Now having completed three marathons, and plans for NYC 2020, along with countless half marathons and other races, she can’t imagine life without running.

 

The Skinny
  • Hometown: Baton Rouge, LA
  • College: LSU – geaux tigers!
  • My teams: LSU & New Orleans Saints
  • Best way to stay active: Running, swimming, & barre
What I Like:
  • About working at FLPT: I enjoy being surrounded by such motivated people.  Whether it’s the patients, motivated in their recovery and drive to achieve their goals; the PTs, motivated to give their patients the best care; the entire staff, motivated to provide the best experience to the NYC endurance community in prehab, recovery, and sport education.
  • About FLPT patients: In the wise words of Elle Woods, “Exercise gives you endorphins. Endorphins make you happy.”  I love working with happy people everyday!
  • About running/sports: I played sports growing up and it was always a family activity. But I was never a runner. Even after running my first and second marathons, I didn’t consider myself a runner. However, during training for my third, I think it all clicked and I finally believed in myself as a runner. Even though my third marathon was a disaster and by far my worst, it still is the proudest race I’ve run. I love seeing the progress I’ve made running, not just in splits & times, but also the mental toughness I’ve developed since the first time I laced up.